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About Rigging Hook Safety, Types, and Uses

Types of Hooks and How Use Rigging Hooks For Lifting

 

Whether you’re lifting, pulling, towing or securing loads, the Columbus McKinnon line of rigging hooks offers unsurpassed strength and durability found in a product made in the USA. CM's history in development and manufacturing of rigging-type products dates back more than 100 years, and we rely on this long-standing knowledge and expertise to develop durable and reliable hooks that can stand up to even the toughest overhead lifting and binding applications.

Available in numerous grades and materials, we have a variety of hook styles for both overhead and non-overhead lifting applications. Learn more about all of our available hook styles below along with important hook safety tips, how to correctly rig a load, and proper maintenance.

 

Types Of Hooks For Overhead and Non-Lifting Applications

 

1. Overhead Lifting Hooks

Not all hooks are appropriate for overhead lifting. When choosing an overhead lifting hook, it’s important to consider the application you will be using it for. If you are lifting a plate, you may need one type of hook, while lifting a vehicle engine may require another. Only alloy hooks should be used in overhead lifting applications. Below are various types of hooks CM recommends for overhead lifting applications.

 

Clevlok Overhead Lifting HookClevlok Hooks: CM trademarked Clevlok® Herc-Alloy® Hooks are typically used for overhead lifting applications. This line of hooks offers easy installation in the shop or in the field. These hooks are 100% proof tested at the factory, thus requiring no additional testing once installed.

Eye Overhead Lifting HookEye Hooks: CM Herc-Alloy® Eye Hooks are an excellent choice when used with mechanical couplers such as the CM Hammerlok®. These hooks are designed for overhead lifting and can be used in place of Clevlok® hooks if preferred. Overhead lifting eye hooks are 100% proof tested at the factory, thus requiring no additional testing once installed using the CM Hammerlok.

S Style Overhead Lifting HookS Hooks: CM Herc-Alloy® “S” Hooks are built and designed for special lifting applications. CM “S” hooks are 100% proof tested at the factory and can be used for various applications where a wide throat opening is desired

Plate Overhead Lift HookPlated Hooks: CM Herc-Alloy® Plate Hooks are designed for lifting plate material, like steel, in vertical and horizontal orientations. Plate hooks should be used in pairs and careful attention should be paid to sling angles when determining the working load limit.

Sorting Overhead Lifting HookSorting Hooks: CM Sorting Hooks are designed to lift and move material with long narrow throat openings. Sorting hooks are 100% proof tested and are available with or without handles.

 

2. Non-Overhead Lifting Hooks

Non-overhead lifting hooks are designed for pulling or load securement application. These hooks do not have the same requirements as those used for overhead lifting. Non-overhead lifting hooks are available in Grades 30, 43, and 70. Grade 80 hooks that are not suitable for overhead lifting are marked T-80 and should only be used for load securement.

 

grab hook non overhead liftingClevis Hooks: Clevis Hooks are not designed for overhead lifting, but instead are most often used for load securement with tie-down chains. Clevis hooks can be used in combination with various grades of chain including Grade 30, 43, 70 and 80. These feature a U-shaped attachment point with a pin to secure chain or other rigging attachments. Different grades of clevis hooks have different working load limits, therefore you must ensure you use the correct hook grade and size for your application.

Slip Hook Non Overhead Lifting.jpgEye Hooks (Non-Cradle Grab & Slip Hooks): Standard Eye Hooks are not designed for overhead lifting, but instead are most often used for load securement with tie-down chains. Eye hooks are used in combination with various grades of chain including Grade 30, 43, 70 and 80. Eye hooks feature a simple circular attachment point for rigging chain or other attachments. Different grades of eye hooks have different working load limits, therefore you must ensure you use the correct hook grade and size for your application.


Rigging Hook Safety, Inspection, and Use

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The following are safety steps that need to be taken to inspect overhead and non-overhead lifting hooks before uss in lifting applications.

 

  • Discard rigging hooks that are worn more than 10% of the original dimension or are worn beyond a specific dimension or tolerance as provided in a wear allowance table, chart or diagram.
  • Discard hooks that have an increase in throat or slot opening more than 5% of the original opening (not to exceed 1/4 inch).
  • Discard hooks with any visibly apparent bend or twist from the plane of the unbent hook. Replace load pins that are permanently distorted.
  • Hooks should not be subjected to bending, exposed to sharp objects or tip loaded.
  • Replacement load pins shall be obtained from the manufacturer of the hook.

 

Rigging Hook Safety Steps

  • Care should be exercised during use, so the overhead crane hook is not abused or damaged.
  • Hooks attached to chain should be selected to match the size and working load limit of the chain.
  • Do not exceed the working load limit or shock load the chain or attachments. Loads applied rapidly or dropped freely can result in serious overloading of the hook.
  • Use proper size chain in the throat of the grab hook. s Hooks should not be subjected to bending, exposed to sharp objects, tip loaded (unless specified by the manufacturer) or loaded in a manner inconsistent with its design.
  • Avoid exposure to corrosive mediums or high temperatures that could affect the thermal treatment and strength of the hook.
  • Hooks can be used from -40 degrees F to 400 degrees F without reduction of working load limit

 


Correct Lifting Operation With Hooks

When rigging and lifting a load its important the hook is correctly positioned where the weight of object being listed is applied in the bowl or saddle of the hook. Side, back and or tip loading are conditions that reduce the hooks lifting capacity and can cause damage to the hook (see illustration below).

How Not to Attach Hook When Lifting Load

  • Determine that the weight of the load to be lifted does not exceed the load rating of the hook.
  • Avoid shock loading
  • Center the load in the base (bowl or saddle) of the hook to prevent point loading of the hook.
  • Do not use overhead crane hooks in such a manner as to place a side or back load on the hook.
  • When using a device to bridge the throat opening of the hook, ensure that no portion of the load is carried by the bridging device.
  • Keep hands and fingers from between the hook and the load.
  • Load duplex (sister) hooks equally on both sides, unless the hook is specifically designed for single loading.
  • Do not load the pinhole in duplex (sister) hooks beyond the rated load of the hook.

 

Lifting Hook Maintenance

  • A safety hook latch that is inoperative or missing shall be repaired or replaced.
  • A hook with a latch that does not bridge the throat opening shall be removed from service until the latch is replaced or repaired and the hook is examined for deformation with special attention to the throat opening.
  • A designated person shall repair cracks, nicks, and gouges by grinding longitudinally, following the contour of the hook, provided no dimension is reduced more than 10 percent (or as recommended by the manufacturer) of its original value.
  • All other repairs shall be performed by the manufacturer or a qualified person.
  • Replacement parts, such as load pins for clevis hooks, shall be at least equal to the original manufacturer’s specifications.


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